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Recruiting and Training Trends Blog

Rethinking the Role of Recruiters

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Recruiters as brand ambassadors – as opposed to salespeople – for your organization

Let’s face it. It’s a candidate-driven marketplace out there. It is more difficult than ever to attract and retain qualified employees. As a recruiter, you’re charged with filling open positions with the most qualified candidates. But there’s more to it than attracting top talent; you need to find the right match for your organization so every hire becomes a productive, engaged, long-term employee. Competing for talent in a buyers’ market requires the recruiter’s role to evolve from a transactional salesperson to a brand ambassador – responsible for establishing the organization’s reputation as a desirable place to work, and keeping the attention of both today’s and tomorrow’s job seekers. Just what makes a brand ambassador and how can you get there?

Convey Your Brand

As an ambassador, your job is not to sell applicants on your company. Instead, you want to serve as a matchmaker, accurately communicating the organization’s brand and identifying applicants’ individual brands to find an ideal match.

What do we mean when we speak of a brand? In this context, it’s not a marketing term. Your brand is your organization’s essence – it’s core values. It helps to think of the organization as a person and assign personality traits to it. Is your organization resourceful, adaptable, creative, independent, serious, spontaneous, responsible? And you’ll need to think beyond the organization’s brand to consider both the department and hiring manager’s brands as well.

You, as a recruiter, are the initial human point of contact for your company’s brand and are in the unique position of using both your experience and your discretion to make vital hiring decisions. You’re searching for a brand match – the perfect relationship where both parties share parallel goals and approach professional life in similar way. 

Salesperson Versus Ambassador

What is ambassador-style recruiting? Essentially, it boils down to respect for the candidate. A respect for their time, their goals, their skills and their potential contribution to your organization. Here’s a look at some of the pronounced differences between salesperson- and ambassador-style recruiting. 

Salesperson-Style Recruiting

Ambassador-Style Recruiting

Match based exclusively on resume to job comparison

Match based on meeting the brand vision and goals

Focus on easily-defined “hard” skills

Consideration of “soft” skills like leadership, oral and written communication

Success based on filled vacancies and speed

Success based on engagement

On-boarding is company-focused (internal tasks and paperwork)

On-boarding is part of the employment experience and geared to promoting early success

Applicant Experience and Onboarding

An ambassador-style recruiter should understand what’s it like to be an applicant, and hone the recruiting and onboarding process to be an overall positive experience. The Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) reports that new employees decide within the first 30 days whether they feel welcome in the organization, and that one in 25 leave their jobs because of a poor (or nonexistent) onboarding program. There are areas in the applicant experience to focus on: 

  1. First impressions: Are your job listings up-to-date and does the language accurately reflect the position and the ideal applicant? Do the listings help convey your brand? Do applicants receive confirmation of the submittal of their resume or application?
  2. Process: Does the process move smoothly with organized, timely interviews? Do you process resumes efficiently? Are non-selected applicants politely notified?
  3. Finalization: Is the onboarding process geared to the applicant? Do they have the tools they need to succeed? Are early expectations communicated?

As part of the applicant experience, we can’t stress enough the importance of treating each applicant with the respect they deserve. You should be looking to attract not just today’s applicants, but tomorrow’s as well. Today’s runner up may be tomorrow’s perfect candidate.

The ambassador-style recruiter is focused on building relationships, not closing deals. By putting the applicants’ first, respecting their time and individuality, and meshing their brand with yours, your organization has the best chance to win top talent – today and beyond.

For more on ambassador-style recruiting, check out our on-demand webinar

What Every Company Ought to Know about Ambassador Style Recruiting

Why Smart Companies Are Making Onboarding a Top Priority

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After spending a great deal of time and resources to bring in quality new hires, many employers are making a major mistake not prioritizing onboarding. 

Despite the fact that effective onboarding improves employee performance and increases employee engagement and retention, according to a report the Partnership for Public Service and Booz Allen Hamilton, a study of 500 U.S. companies of varying sizes shows that the average amount spent on onboarding per new hire is just $67—and a third of these companies spend no money at all. 

Effective onboarding doesn’t have to be expensive, but the figures above are still alarming. 

No matter what the final tally is on your own company’s onboarding efforts, there are certain things you want to get right to make the process effective. Of course, all necessary paperwork must be completed quickly and efficiently. But you also want to get new hires established in their jobs and connected with your culture, so that you can get them up to speed as quickly as possible. This should begin on day one with the right tools, for example like a Fact Sheet for New Hires. You can create an informative infographic fact sheet template for new hires from Venngage that outlines important info about your organization. This will go along way towards helping new hires will feel more familiar with the company. After all, it typically takes about eight months to get new employees fully productive, but getting them comfortable as quickly as possible helps minimize that time period. On the other hand, failing to provide a reasonable orientation can leave new employees “confused and disoriented,” which is far from conducive for high performance and engagement. 

Smart companies are recognizing the importance of onboarding, with the most successful companies connecting it with employee performance. And more and more are recognizing that it’s a good idea to begin the onboarding process even before a new hire’s first day. According to Aberdeen’s “An Employee-Centric Digital Workplace” report, best-in-class companies are 53% more likely than others to begin the onboarding process before day one (this is also known as pre-boarding). Additionally, best-in-class companies are 39% more likely than others to measure employee engagement with onboarding to ensure new hires understand what’s expected of them. 

So if you’re looking to get better performance from your new hires, consider seeing if you can improve the onboarding you provide. 

How Modern Talent Acquisition Software Can Help

Software allows you to automate crucial aspects of the onboarding process. For example, you ensure that all necessary documents have been filled out correctly, saving time and preventing problems. You also can manage and track the other tasks that need to be completed after someone is hired (email setup, ID photo, parking pass, etc.) As a result, you can put your focus on higher-value onboarding priorities—such as making sure the new employees you just hired have the proper attention to get off on the right foot, which improves performance, engagement and retention levels.

To learn other important steps for improving your hiring results, read our new article –  “4 Key Steps to Successful Talent Acquisition.”

 

4 Ways to Promote Better Recruiter/Hiring Manager Relationships

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A Bersin report found that “developing strong relationships with hiring managers is the top driver of talent acquisition performance.” In fact, it was found to be four times more influential than any other factor studied. 

Yet many employers are clearly failing at managing the recruiter/hiring manager relationship. From the same report: 80% of recruiters believe they have a good understanding of the jobs they’re recruiting for, but 61% of hiring managers disagree. 

Given the tremendous gap in their opinions, it’s no wonder managing the relationships between these two groups is one of our “4 Keys Steps to Successful Talent Acquisition.”

The recruiter/hiring manager relationship is critically important for two reasons: 

  1. The recruiter needs to understand the skills and qualifications the hiring manager is seeking for given job roles or the wrong candidates can be delivered, which results in bad hires or delays in hiring.
  1. The recruiter and hiring manager need to work together to avoid time-costing bottlenecks that slow the hiring process. Bottlenecks frustrate candidates and increase time to hire. 

So, how can you promote quality relationships between your recruiters and hiring managers? 

  1. Encourage frequent, effective communication at every step of the process. At many organizations, this isn’t happening—which isn’t surprising, considering the statistics above from the Bersin report. “The lack of communication between recruiters and hiring managers is the biggest challenge we have in the industry—period,” Steve Lowisz, CEO of recruiting and recruitment research firm Qualigence International, told SHRM.  

  1. Take steps to build trust and agreement. Have recruiters and hiring managers meet face to face in an effort to establish themselves as partners working together toward a singular goal: making quality hires in an efficient manner. As part of this, recruiters and hiring managers should agree upon written expectations for the relationship and how they’re going to work together. Doing so will help them stay on the same page, especially since both will have documentation to refer to.             
  1. Have them hold process improvement meetings. Recruiters and hiring managers should hold occasional meetings to evaluate how they can work together more efficiently and more effectively. For example, they can examine if the recruiters have been sending along the right quantities and types of candidates to the hiring manager for interviews.                                                                                                               
  1. Use modern talent acquisition software. Software will help recruiters and hiring managers stay organized consolidating candidate and job information, and will prevent communication breakdowns using notifications and auto-alerts throughout the process. In fact, recruiters and hiring managers won’t even have to log in to the software to be alerted of an update—smart emails will keep everyone on the same page. So, for example, both recruiters and hiring managers will be aware if changes are made to a job description. Plus, there will be no more giant piles of paper to sift through, which will save time, eliminate frustration and reduce cost. 

Your talent acquisition efforts have a tremendous impact on the future of your company. Don’t let poor or mediocre recruiter/hiring manager relationships spoil that future. 

For more on managing the recruiter/hiring manager relationship, and to learn other important steps for improving your hiring, read our new article –

4 Key Steps to Successful Talent Acquisition

Putting the Training Wheels in Motion – Five tips to help launch an effective Learning Management & Employee Development Program

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Are you considering implementing a formalized employee development program? It is an investment that’s likely to pay off. Organizations with a career development program in place enjoy up to 250 percent higher productivity. And the benefits don’t stop there. Reduced turnover, higher employee engagement levels, increased innovation and improved risk management are some of the additional benefits companies realize when they implement a formal training and career development program. Training also serves as a recruiting tool – you’re more likely to attract and keep good employees if you offer them development opportunities. 

If your company doesn’t have a training and development program in place, it may seem daunting to get started. But it doesn’t have to be. Here are five basics to keep in mind as you work to implement an effective and efficient employee training and development solution in your organization. 

1. Consider it an investment

There is a tendency among business owners and executives to view employee training as an optional expense — and that mindset can prove very costly to your organization in the long run. The moment you think of employee development and training as just another expenditure, you’ll neglect it. Instead, think of it as an investment that can prove extremely valuable for the long-term success and growth of your organization.  

2. Remember you’re planning a program, not an event

A training program is more than just a series of unrelated courses or workshops. It should reflect your organization’s goals, as well as the needs of your staff. What’s important is that your staff training program has some reason behind its structure. An unrelated series of presentations or activities might have some value, but it will benefit neither the staff nor the organization as much as a training program that forms a coherent whole. Spend the time to outline and flesh-out your course offering, aligning it with your business needs and goals. Document the desired outcomes of each course and determine how you will measure and track those outcomes. 

3. Involve your staff

Make a point to involve staff members in the planning and implementation of your training program. The people who actually do the work are usually in the best position to figure out what their needs are. Ask questions, gather input, and structure training opportunities that meet employees where they are and take them where they want or need to go. Training breeds commitment, and committed employees are happier and more productive. 

4. Incorporate the basics – but don’t stop there

Companies often decide to implement a training program to address compliance matters (think OSHA or Department of Labor), manage risk ((think sexual harassment and diversity training), and/or professional certification or credential tracking (think nurses, teachers or commercial truck drivers) – and these are certainly areas that benefit from a formalized approach to training. Job function training is another common (and worthy) goal of an employee training program.  

As you plan your training program, consider broadening it into a full-fledged employee development program. Think of training as a retention tool, helping to instill loyalty and commitment from employees. One idea would be to offer career development courses, enabling employees to prepare themselves for promotion. Staff will be more likely to stay if you offer them ways to learn and grow while at your company. Don’t give them a reason to move on letting them stagnate once they’ve mastered initial tasks.  

5. Leverage technology

A training and development initiative won’t succeed if it isn’t easy to maintain. Companies often rely on spreadsheets, Word documents and calendar reminders to track employee training. Usually these programs were initiated when the company was much smaller, or was training fewer individuals. A disjointed system like this requires administrators to enter data in multiple locations, making reporting, analytics and data sharing virtually impossible. While this may work when your training needs are minimal, as you grow this system becomes overly labor intensive. 

Employee training, with the myriad of details to be tracked, is an ideal candidate for automation. Not long ago, learning management software was only within financial reach of the largest companies. But now, there are affordable learning management solutions accessible to small and mid-sized companies. Give your initiative the best chance of succeeding establishing an easy to manage infrastructure that’s both scalable and accessible. 

Interested in more suggestions for launching an effective employee training and development program?

Learn More 

 

The First Key Step to Successful Talent Acquisition

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Employers who want to improve their talent acquisition should take note of these statistics from two recent Aberdeen Group reports: 

  1. 47% of respondents in the “An Employee-Centric Digital Workplace” report said they have trouble sourcing enough qualified candidates.
  2. According to the “Best Practice: Use Modern Recruiting to Stay Cutting Edge report, best-in-class organizations are 55% more likely to proactively build and expand their candidate pipelines, regardless of current hiring needs. 

These figures show you need to focus on quality sourcing and building a strong talent pipeline. In fact, doing so is the first of our “4 Key Steps to Successful Talent Acquisition.” Let’s take a closer look. 

Sourcing

Quality sourcing may not win the war for talent for your company but poor sourcing sure can lose it. In the talent acquisition process, if you source the wrong candidates, your efforts are doomed from the start. If you don’t source enough of the right candidates, you’ll struggle to consistently fill your talent needs. 

Two important elements of quality sourcing are:

  1. Tracking and measuring your talent sources
  2. Effective recruitment marketing

Tracking and measuring the performance of your talent sources (internal referrals, external recruiting partners, social sites, job boards, corporate career sites) is critical because it’s the only way to optimally focus and adjust your sourcing efforts and budget. 

As for effective recruitment marketing, communicating intriguing messages about your organization and your culture to candidates and potential candidates helps attract more candidates while also making candidates eager to join your organization. In fact, employers worldwide are recognizing the importance of recruitment marketing. According to LinkedIn’s Global Recruiting Trends 2016 report, 59% of respondents are “investing more in their employer brand compared to last year.” 

Talent Pipeline

Another essential part of finding and hiring the right people (those with the specific skills, qualities and capabilities your organization needs) is knowing exactly who’s in your talent pipeline. This includes both internal talent and external candidates.  

Internal talent—Your organization may have a surplus of some skills, qualities and capabilities, and a shortage of others. By understanding your internal talent pipeline, you’ll know which positions you have the bench strength to fill internally, and you’ll identify skills shortages that you need to fortify before they become major problems.  

External Candidates—By maintaining a strong candidate pipeline, you’ll always have a pool of qualified talent that you can use to fill positions when they open, reducing time to hire and increasing your quality of hire.  

Modern Talent Acquisition Software Can Help!

Modern talent acquisition software is a great tool for improving your sourcing and talent pipeline. 

Sourcing: It enables you to efficiently and effectively track and measure your talent sources. You can see the quantity and types of candidates you’re receiving, the talent sources they came from and identify trends. You can also evaluate the effectiveness of individual job postings—as software can show you the candidates being attracted and how far those candidates made it through the hiring process.  

Talent pipeline: Modern talent acquisition software empowers you to track your current employees’ skills and abilities, helping you identify both quality internal candidates and skills needs in your organization.  

The result is you can access and evaluate data that will help you make more informed decisions and identify high-quality candidates. 

For more sourcing and talent pipeline tips, and to learn other important steps for improving your hiring, read our new article “4 Key Steps to Successful Talent Acquisition.”

Five ways to put your customers’ best interest first It’s the right way to do business – and there’s even a law about it now!

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You may have heard about the recent change made the Labor Department affecting how financial professionals handle the dollars they invest on their customers’ behalf. Those professionals must now act in the best interest of their clients. Really? You mean they weren’t?

Shouldn’t all business professionals act in their clients’ best interests – without it being the law? And, just what does acting in a client’s best interest mean? Here are five simple – but often overlooked – ways you can put your clients first. 

  1. Stay connected

We all like knowing that someone is thinking of us – it makes us feel important and valued. While flowers or a foot massage might be a good way to demonstrate that attention for a loved one, for our clients, it might be a regular phone call to see how the business is running, what has changed and what new challenges have emerged. In addition to regular phone calls or email check-ins, it’s smart to implement a solid marketing plan that keeps your firm top of mind and relevant. That marketing plan could include collateral such as a newsletter, user group meetings or webcasts. Communication like this enables you to better able to anticipate an upcoming need and offer your firm’s assistance – before someone else does.

  1. Brainstorm solutions

We’re talking collaboration here. You may be the software expert, but your client is the expert on their business. Work through problems and solutions together – making sure you take the time to thoroughly understand both their pain points and their ideal outcome. As a software vendor, you have access to a large number of solution offerings. If you’re asking the right questions, and listening to your client’s pain points carefully, you’re more likely to be able to recommend the right solution at the right time. By becoming a strategic partner to your clients, you’ll raise the value of your firm’s services, and build long-term, mutually-beneficial relationships.

  1. Speak frankly

You aren’t doing your clients any favors telling them what they want to hear or making promises you cannot keep. Respect their time, money and technology investment setting realistic expectations for the solutions you’re proposing and the return on investment they can anticipate. You won’t have all the answers to every question, but if you are honest and candid throughout every interaction, you will gain your clients’ respect. And remember that it’s ok to say no. You can’t resolve every issue they bring to you, and your honesty in that regard will go a long way.

  1. Become indispensable

You become indispensable to your client not simply successfully completing each engagement you win. You become indispensable staying out in front of their business – continually seeking and recommending ways they can leverage software to meet new business challenges.

  1. Remain informed and in touch with current trends, solutions and strategies

The wisest people don’t pretend to know everything, the wisest people are the ones that seek input from others – experts in their respective fields of knowledge, and then distill that information into new ideas, directions and innovation. As a software provider, you generate value for your clients when you bring them new ideas and solutions based on your research of their organization and the available business solutions that overlap with their marketplace. The more problem-solutions you can offer your clients, the higher the value they will place on your relationship, and will always look to you first as their expert go-to provider. Keep in mind that your clients are constantly being bombarded with marketing messages from competing providers offering complementary products and services. If you haven’t been the one to introduce your clients to their options, they may respond to those messages – leaving you behind.

Visibility Software has a flexible and friendly partner program designed to support you in introducing our Cyber Recruiter and Cyber Train solutions to your clients. You can find more information about that program here.

 

Saying “I do” to Employee Engagement – It’s a long-term commitment that starts with recruiting

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Employee engagement is a workplace concept that refers to how committed employees are to their organization’s goals and values, and how motivated they are to contribute to the organization’s success. Research has shown that highly engaged employees: 

  • Are more customer focused, more creative at work, and take less sick leave
  • Care about the future of their organization and put in greater effort to help it meet its goals and objectives
  • Feel proud of the organization they work for, are inspired to do their best, and motivated to deliver
  • Are much less likely to leave the organization.

Perhaps it’s not surprising then, that companies whose employees express a high level of engagement are more profitable, have greater revenue figures, and have higher levels of customer satisfaction. A company that values its employees and invests in them right from the beginning is laying the foundation for high levels of engagement. Here are some ways your organization can begin building employee engagement during the recruiting cycle.

Meet Them Where They’re At

Social media has quickly become a powerful recruiting tool. In fact, a recent Aberdeen Group survey reported that 68 percent of “best in class” recruiters think social media is “crucial” to their recruitment strategies. Your company’s LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter accounts can help you spread the word about new job opportunities. They also help put a human touch on your organization, providing a way to introduce and showcase elements of your corporate culture and mission.

Respect Their Time

Strive to be an employer that respects candidates’ time and efforts streamlining the application process. Post open positions to your company’s website and/or an online job board like Monster.com® and Careerbuilder.com®. Make it simple for them to apply to more than one position at a time. And, send an acknowledgement email letting them know that their resume was received. An applicant tracking and recruiting solution, like Cyber Recruiter, can automate and streamline these tasks, integrating them fully into your workflow.

Conduct Effective Interviews

An interview is the first impression for both employer and candidate. It’s not only a chance for you to assess the candidate; it’s also the candidate’s chance to observe your corporate culture. As many as 42 percent of companies now employee video conferencing (solutions like Spark Hire) in the interview process. This is a great way to give both parties that vital first impression without either of you incurring the expense of an in-person interview.

Make Your Proposal  

Once you’ve identified your next hire, make the proposal a good one. Prepare and send an offer letter along with onboarding forms. Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) help speed and automate this part of the process, letting your candidate know you value them and respect their decision-making process. And of course, the applicants that were not selected deserve the same level of respect, so be certain you send them an email or letter as notification.

Prevent Information Overload

On your new employees’ first day on the job, don’t inundate them with paperwork. Much of the necessary information was gathered during the recruiting cycle, and if you’re using an ATS, that data can transfer seamlessly to your payroll and HRMS applications, eliminating the need for duplicate data entry. 

Use that first day instead to make the new employee feel welcome with an office tour, introductions to key personnel, and a welcome gift bag filled with product samples and company swag. 

Striving for high levels of employee engagement simply makes smart business sense. Think of employee engagement as a long-term, evolving relationship between your organization and your employees – one that begins long before the employee starts to work. By building employee engagement strategies into your recruiting methods, you are demonstrating that yours is a company that invests in its most valuable assets.

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For more valuable information about employee engagement and improving the talent acquisition process, check out our best practices guide – 

Best Practices Guide – 4 Key Steps to Successful Talent Acquisition

 

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Best Questions to see if Your Job Candidate Has a Positive Attitude

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Attitudes, we’ve all got them. Employers, job candidates and even employees have their own unique personality. When it comes to hiring, how do you decipher which job candidates have positive and productive attitudes when the most face time you receive is that of a short-lived interview? Uncovering a potential employee’s basic personality traits is no easy feat and to truly uncover one’s underlying personality traits and general disposition (whether it be sunny or muddled in grey-black clouds) is even more difficult.

Luckily you won’t have to sweat it for too long! In a recent Quora post, professionals in the HR world discussed just this situation.

This question originally appeared on Quora. Answers have been edited for clarity and brevity.

Q: What is the best question to ask in an interview in order to determine if a job candidate has good attitude?

“I ask candidates to explain their motivations in choosing to join and leave companies they’ve worked for, including their current employer. I find these simple questions reveal a lot about motivation and attitude.

Years ago I interviewed with a well known CEO and at the end he asked me “are you lucky?” I was taken aback, it was such an open ended question, but he didn’t seem to want to volunteer more context. I gave him my honest perspective. Afterwards he told me the importance of attitude in his leadership team, and that is the question he uses to assess it. 

John Ciancutti is an engineer and Chief Product Officer at Coursera

 

“Good attitude” is a commonly used phrase and I must confess that after years of interviewing it’s still never clear this side of surly what it means.

The best way I know to do three things; how does the candidate interact and engage with you, how does s/he interact with other people with whom they’ve interviewed and interacted, and how do people describe how the candidate behaves if you get to the reference point.

There are people who appear to be positive and can-do’s who turn snarky and snarly when they’re “off camera.” The only good way I know to make an accurate assessment is collecting as much observational data as I can.

And as a the way, I love collecting data from people like receptionists and recruiting coordinators; they have have dealt with lots of candidates, and their observations are usually spot-on.

J. Mike Smith is a talent coach and a performance coach

 

 Tweet This: Some tricky ways to collect observational data:

 

Most people aren’t ready to admit what they’re bad at.  When I was a manager recruiter in another life, one of the key litmus test questions was getting a cogent and (perceptibly honest) answer to the unanswerable questions:

“Tell me about a time in a past assignment where you seriously messed up and had to be reprimanded and/or corrected?  Tell me about how you felt and what you did about that reprimand?”

Nobody in management has EVER made it to being a manager without screwing something up.  You can say you haven’t, but I won’t believe you.  Mess-ups are natural and a part of growth.  Most people cover up for them, deny them and aren’t ready to answer these questions. A truly mature manager will admit it and answer honestly.  Only a very amazing liar will be able to come up with something on the fly (good for them), the rest of us will have to access memory and be direct about it.

Dan Holliday, Corporate Recruiter 

 

Tweet This: “Nobody in management has EVER made it to being a manager without screwing something up.” -Dan Holliday

 

Finding a candidate with a positive attitude during your initial interview can be accomplished in various ways: 

      Ask probing, emotion-based questions to elicit a telling response

      Use your gut, if the person seems to be “putting on a show” it can be a red flag.

      Look for genuine qualities, confidence and of course, honesty.

      Focus on which candidates seem unable to admit defeat or failure.

      Ask about former co-workers to determine positivity and cultural fit. 

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4 Reasons Employee Development is the Golden Egg of Every Successful Company

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According to Training Mag, the average amount a midsize company dedicated to the training budget was $1.5 million.

Companies of every size are shelling out the big bucks to train their new employees. Why? Because new employees are an investment and the future and they need to be molded into the common practices and company culture of the workforce in which they are placed. Communication is key in order to keep those new nuggets of talent and in case you hadn’t heard the cost of replacing an employee is through the roof these days. It costs 50-60% of an employee’s annual salary. 

So why should you revamp your employee development program?

 

1. Engaging with your employees leads to SUCCESS

This one’s a no-brainer, but is often seriously overlooked. Engage with your employees, especially your new ones. The more your employees participate in company culture and are associated with the company’s goals and interests the more they can support all those pieces.

 

“Employee development is a way that you can keep your employees engaged at work to prevent that kind of boredom from setting in. Interesting training programs, and future development events that are fun or challenging to look forward to — this removes the plodding daily feel to a job that leads to that dreaded boredom.”

Chad Halvorson, When I Work

 

Unsurprisingly, 70% of employees who don’t have confidence in the abilities of senior leadership are not fully engaged. Engagement is easy when tackled from a conscious standpoint.

Tweet This: See what happens when employees don’t believe in the abilities of senior leadership:

 

2. The fiscal and emotional costs of replacing an employee

The stresses that come with replacing an employee can sometimes outweigh the fiscal costs of replacing said employee. Our advice? Avoid it all together with a streamlined, simple, informative and productive employee development process. For example, 60% of companies have already started re-engineering their performance management system.

Tweet This: 60% of companies are re-engineering performance management. Have you?

In need of some help in this department? Check out Visibility’s talent development solutions to help aid in the assistance of employee development.

 

3. HR Professionals are constantly looking for ways to improve their processes

Keep up on your employee development processes. Setting up a good platform in which an employee can learn paves the way for successful training and continual development in the future. 80% of companies believe HR skills are an issue and 39% rate this as an outright issue. 

 

“Highly-structured, one-size-fits-all learning programs don’t work anymore. Individuals must own, self-direct, and control their learning futures. Yet they can’t do it alone, nor do you want them to. The development and growth of your talent is vital to your ongoing success, ability to innovate, and overall productivity.”

Keith Ferrazzi, Entrepreneur

 

4. Informal learning, while great, should not be your main vessel of training

Who doesn’t love inadvertent learning? That special kind of learning sharp witted new employees simply pick up from observing and inferring from other employees? While this type of “off the cuff” training is great, it should NOT be a company’s only means for knowledge sharing. An astounding 87% of companies rate “retention, engagement, and culture” as an important imperative and 50% rate it “urgent.”

Leaving too much for an employee to infer can lead to major communication problems in the long run. Misinterpretation is the essence of all workplace issues! Be nothing if not overly clear about what you expect from your employees.

Now you have your reasons, but here comes the real work. Check out the many programs Visibility Software has to offer in the employee development realm if you don’t know where to start. You might be surprised at just how easy employee development can really be!

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3 Tips for Teaching Employees to Overcome Mistakes

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Only 13% of employees are engaged at work according to Gallup. Not completely understanding daily tasks or lacking interest in projects can be one of the many factors for the myriad of mistakes employees make. The truth is, no matter who you are, mistakes will happen. They aren’t fun and no one loves dealing with the repercussions, but how you or your employees choose to approach the solution can make all the difference. Consider mistakes as an opportunity for growth. How a leader guides employees through errors as well as how that leader solves their own can make all the difference in a team dynamic.

 

Learn from the mistake

As Lifehacker suggests, making forgiveness a part of the daily routine is pivotal to handling those larger, more impactful errors:

You’re not the first person to make a major error. Look at the failures of the people you look up to, and you’ll realize it’s all a part of the process. The greatest of the greats was a human too, and they most likely had more than a few “whoopsies” in their lifetime.”

Tweet This: “The greatest of greats was a human too, and they most likely had more than a few “whoopsies”…”

Don’t kid yourself; you’ve been in the hot seat before and it wasn’t fun. That said, you can probably remember the repercussions as well as how the issue was solved. If handled correctly, that same error was never once made again. That is the learning that an employee needs. Solving those smaller issues quickly and with little emotion makes the larger issues easier to approach. That’s the trust employees need to have in leadership. The more trust, the more innovation.

 

Owning the mistake

According to a study, 70% of decisions we make will be wrong. Remind your employee not to be defensive when a problem does occur rather, take time to analyze what went wrong. Don’t let the error be the focus of any following correspondence. That will encourage defensiveness and  being defensive not only wastes time and money but distracts from the solution.

Tweet This: 70% of the decisions we make will be wrong. Learn to forgive error, like this: 

This is an opportune time to lead example. There always has to be give and take. It is easier to own up to leadership when those who manage the team are aware of their own failings. Leaders who are defensive are generally rated as less effective on measures like self-awareness, communication, adaptability and ability to meet business objectives. 

Defensiveness… hinders leaders’ ability to learn and, as a result, their success. The researchers looked at feedback that 134 leaders received from their managers and found that defensive leaders were generally rated as less effective on measures including self-awareness, communication, adaptability, and ability to meet business objectives.” – Shana Lebowitz (@ShanaDLebowitz), Business Insider

 

Fix the mistake

Once all issues are laid out on the table and blame is accepted, move on to the solution. Remind your employee that while everyone does make mistakes, owning up and fixing the mistake is the most responsible thing to do. Fully explain what needs to be done to right the wrong, then ask the employee to add input. Ask questions that demand answers.

      What can I, as your manager, do to eliminate the chance of this happening again?

      Is there a way your team can support you to avoid this happening in the future?

      Is there a part of your job or daily tasks that you are confused about?

      Are there any tools that you believe could help you do your job better?

Tweet This: Next time your employee makes a mistake, try this approach: 

 A study found 44% of employees report they didn’t understand the change they were being asked to make. When the approach is one-sided and lacks interaction, the employee loses a valuable step in the process of learning. It is important to help guide your employee to the fix as well as making he or she an integral piece in actualizing the solution. There may be a reason as to why the mistake happened in the first place, and if the right conversation takes place, avoiding recurrence is far more plausible.

Tweet This: 44% of employees report not understanding changes they’re asked to make. Try this when leading change: 

Forbes found that 51% of employees said they would rather have had their employer compliment them, point out the wrong and ending once again with a compliment. Some may know this as the “sandwich” method. It might be difficult to find in a stressed time to find the positives, but remember, there’s a reason that you chose to continue working with this employee. Be stern, don’t belittle and make the conversation a two way street. Your employee’s engagement and dedication is on the line as well as the team who leans on he or she. This method will have your employee leaving the meeting encouraged and ready to move forward to success.

Managing, mentoring and training teams is difficult. When you add in organizing the paperwork and compliance concerns of employee mistakes, the stress only heightens. Considering the ways you can curb mistakes before they happen is important. Increase productivity and efficiency with Visibility Software’s learning management system, Cyber Train, so employees are well-trained and engaged, keeping mistakes are kept at a minimum.

Cyber Train Demo

 

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